Mesothelioma Cancer Diagnosis?

FREE Mesothelioma Packet for Patients and Families Diagnosed with Mesothelioma.

This helpful and comprehensive packet includes 3 books on the basics of mesothelioma, treatment options, best hospitals, resources for veterans, the asbestos trust funds, financial assistance and a number of other important topics. Order the FREE packet by completing the form.

1 Doctor Written Book

  • What is Mesothelioma?
  • Diagnosis
  • Coping
  • Treatment Options
  • Caring for Patients
  • Clinical Trials
  • Best Treatment Centers

2 Asbestos Trust Funds

Find out about the $30 billion set aside in the asbestos trust to help pay for treatment and personal expenses while fighting mesothelioma cancer. The Asbestos Trust Funds are the quickest way to recover compensation.

3 Veteran Resources

Book includes VA Forms for Pension and Medical Benefits information on VA Hospitals specializing in treating mesothelioma, and a list of the best VA mesothelioma surgeons. Also includes information on what compensation is available for Veterans.

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At Risk Jobs

It is inhalation of asbestos fibers which can cause mesothelioma or asbestos lung cancer. Even low exposure levels of the tiny fibers or asbestos dust are very dangerous. After the 1980''s workplace exposure to asbestos became rare, but it can take up to 40 years for signs of mesothelioma asbestos lung cancer to be noticed.

Most patients were exposed to asbestos fibers on the job or in the workplace in what is known as occupational exposure. Another form of exposure is called para-occupational exposure. This form of asbestos exposure can be harder to determine the source, but it usually develops from a family member who has been exposed in the workplace.

Typically the family member is exposed to asbestos dust or fibers from the worker's clothing, and when the clothing is handled the dust is released and inhaled. Family members that are exposed in this way, may be exposed to smaller amounts, but are still very much at risk.

In the same way, those that have homes or work near facilities that have asbestos may also be at risk even though there is not obvious direct contact. The fine asbestos dust can easily be carried by the wind over long distances.

Likewise, people who live near these types of sites likely to have asbestos around the facility are also at risk: refineries, power plants, factories, shipyards, steel mills and building demolition. These work sites can release asbestos fibers into the environment and contaminate nearby residential neighborhoods.

Many occupations have an increased risk for developing lung cancer. For example, asbestos insulation workers have 92 times the risk of developing lung cancer, and smelter workers have 3-8 times the risk of developing lung cancer. The risk of lung cancer is also increased in people who work in the manufacturing of certain industrial gases, pharmaceuticals, soaps and detergents, paints, inorganic pigments, plastics, and synthetic rubber. The risk of developing lung cancer is related to the amount of exposure to the cancer-causing agent.

Trades:

Occupations:

Many occupations have an increased risk for developing lung cancer. For example, asbestos insulation workers have 92 times the risk of developing of lung cancer, and smelter workers have 3-8 times the risk of developing lung cancer. The risk of lung cancer is also increased in people who work in the manufacturing of certain industrial gases, pharmaceuticals, soaps and detergents, paints, inorganic pigments, plastics, and synthetic rubber. The risk of developing lung cancer is related to the amount of exposure to the cancer-causing agent.

For example, the risk of lung cancer in humans is proportional to the number of cigarettes smoked. The risk of developing lung cancer is 8-20 times greater in smokers compared to people who have never smoked. A smaller, but real risk exists for cigar and pipe smokers. Some lung cancer causing agents react together to significantly worsen the risk of developing cancer. The combined exposure to asbestos and tobacco smoke clearly multiplies the risk of developing lung cancer.

The risk of lung cancer is greater for those living in urban areas. This risk is approximately 1.2 to 2.3 times that of people living in rural areas. There is also an increased risk of lung cancer in smokers whose close relatives have had lung cancer. Scarring in the lungs from previous infections or injury can be associated with and increased risk of cancer.